Women miners join national clean-up campaign

By Takudzwa Mahove @josfisher92 

Zvishavane - Since the beginning of time women have had the unspoken role of keeping their communities and homes clean. As such  they have made a mark on the hygienic front keeping their homes and environments clean as the sole care givers.

Women venturing into male dominated sectors in industry and mining  has not taken away this drive by women to always keep their surroundings clean and habitable and the Zvishavane Women in the small scale mining sector showed this on the Friday of April as they joined the National Clean-up effort at Escrow Shopping Centre in the mining town.

Amakhosikazi Media spoke to some of the women who said they felt they owed it to the community to join in and clean the environment and teach (as mothers do) the community to practice habits that promote good health.

The women however bemoaned the absence of key cleaning  tools like dust bins which ensure litter is not dumped in the wrong places. 

They called on the responsible authorities to address this problem as a matter of urgency. Listen to more below. 

{https://soundcloud.com/amakhosikazi-media-channel/women-in-mining}

The Clean-up event was graced by the Midlands Minister of state, Senator Larry Mavhima who emphasised that the clean-up efforts around the country were meant to curb medieval diseases like cholera and Typhoid. Listen below.

{https://soundcloud.com/amakhosikazi-media-channel/clean-country}

During the clean-up the minister came across a homestead that had been neglected by most of its inhabitants and had become an illegal dumpsite, he took time to talk to one of the inhabitants and was impressed by the woman’s positive attitude and willingness to change and join in. Listen to more below.

{https://soundcloud.com/amakhosikazi-media-channel/dirty-home}

in December 2018, President Emmerson Mnangagwa declared every first Friday of each month a national clean-up day. This was a move aimed at instilling good hygienic habits in all Zimbabweans and keeping the environment clean in a bid to curb typhoid and cholera outbreaks that have haunted the country several times in the past decade.